• Tikkun Olam
    Tikkun Olam Members worked with Habitat for Humanity
  • You are Welcome Here
    You are Welcome Here
  • Youth Kallah
    Youth Kallah Teens from the whole Northeast gathered at TBK
  • Family
    Family Pray and stay--a perfect summer Shabbat
  • Tikkun Olam
    Tikkun Olam Our youth learn to work for social justice.

From Darkness to Light
From Rabbi Levy

It is hard to believe that just a few short months ago, Rabbi Stein and I were beginning our tenure as the rabbis of Temple B’rith Kodesh. But here we are, six months later, completely immersed in the very full schedule at TBK. The winter has taken over and we have already celebrated so many wonderful holidays together. As the winter months drag on, we look forward to the spring and the holidays that come with it.

The Hebrew month of Shevat, which typically falls sometime during January and February, brings an interesting and sometimes forgotten holiday, Tu B’Shevat, the fifteenth day of Shevat. This holiday is often called the “Birthday of the Trees.” Tu B’Shevat is also one of the four holidays we refer to as a New Year. Of course, we know that Rosh Hashanah is the “Head of the Year.” But, Tu B’Shevat is also a New Year, a New Year of the trees. Historically, Tu B’Shevat was the time of year that people paid taxes on their fruit trees. Centuries later, we celebrate Tu B’Shevat with a Seder of fruits, nuts, and wine, all foods that come from trees.

So, why celebrate the New Year of the Trees in the middle of winter, when all of the trees have shed their leaves and stand bare in the cold, gray sky? Traditionally, Shevat was the month that the almond trees in Israel began to bloom and bring some much needed color into the dark winter. We, however, are far from springtime. Looking at the empty trees reminds us that we still have months of cold and snow ahead of us. But perhaps Tu B’Shevat can actually be a reminder of the wonderful warm seasons to come? Perhaps the New Year of the Trees is also a light in the middle of the dark, much like the candles that warmed our hearts during Chanukah?

May this Tu B’Shevat be a reminder to you and your family of the gifts that trees bring to our lives. From food to shelter, trees are constantly giving to us. May we remember to give back to the trees. Please take some time to plant a tree or give tzedakah to an organization that can plant a tree for you. It’s time to do our part and take a stand for trees. Chag Sameach!

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Temple Beth David & Temple Beth El
Invite members of TBK to participate in their
1st Annual Joint Golf Outing @ Eagle Vale Golf Course (Fairport, NY)
and Kosher Dinner @ Temple Beth El
Monday, August 7, 2017
This event is held in memory of Jay Cohen

Golf and Dinner - $125.00
Dinner Only - $50.00

  9:00am     Registration, team pictures
10:00am     Shotgun tee start
                   (Lunch at Eagle Vale Golf Club included)
4:00pm       Hors D'oeuvres at Temple Beth El (139 Winton Rd S.)
5:00pm       Kosher Steak/Chicken/Salmon/Veggie Meal at Temple Beth El

Registration/sponsor forms are online. For additional information please contact Gary Cohen at 329-4765.

https://www.tberochester.org/1st-annual-joint-golf-outing

golf

Project  Homeless Connect
As the summer solstice comes to us, it's not too early to plan for fall.  Project Homeless Connect Rochester will be coming again to the Blue Cross Arena on September 14.
    If you'd like to volunteer again, please register on the website: http://homelessconnectrochester.org/
    If you'd like to help with a coat drive, please reply and let me know and I'll put you in charge with those managing the coat collection. The coat room is one of the things our guests look forward to and we have to work hard to ensure that there are enough to go around.  We could use your help.

Sign up to learn more about the Reform movement's national and international social justice efforts!

Temple B'rith Kodesh is part of the Union for Reform Judaism, which has many different constituencies. One is the Religious Action Center in Washington, DC, which works on dozens of pressing social action concerns.  Follow this link if you would like to receive regular updates and action alerts from the RAC.

As mentioned in Rabbi Stein's Annual Meeting address, there will be a number of summer conversations and planning sessions to explore our engagement with advocacy and other aspects of social action. Making connections with the RAC is just one part of this effort, for those who are inclined to participate.